The CSMonitor going Web-only

The CSMonitor is going to stop printing its weekday edition and go web-only Monday through Friday. I’ve always had a soft spot for the Monitor because of well-written articles and the fact that it continued to maintain its foreign bureaus at a time when the rest of the industry was cutting back and relying on syndicated NYT/AP/Reuters stories. Here’s hoping this experiment succeeds. (Incidentally, the Monitor gets 90% of its revenue from subscriptions and only 10% from ads. Like Wikipedia, it’s a non-profit.)

Flat-Rate 3G Internet

Mobile operator 3 is all set to offer ADSL/Cable-style flat-rate pricing plans for people using their 3G network. UK service will begin next month, other countries are slated to follow soon. This was long overdue; I remember the complete cluelessness on a 3 rep’s face in 2003 when I asked him why I had to pay extra to send email on a network touting its data capabilities. 3 and its cohorts seem to have gotten the religion now, with Sony-Ericsson’s President quoted as saying “Moving to flat rate charging is the key to unlocking the value of the mobile internet”. No kidding.

Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain

I remember being impressed by Darren Aronofsky’s Pi (for its sheer manic energy — the mathematics were dodgy) and have heard very good things about Requiem for a Dream, so I’m looking forward to The Fountain — it’s a challenging plot for a movie, but I’d expect no less from Aronofsky.

Get Custom Overlays in Google Maps

Google Earth has had overlays for a long time — they make it easy to annotate maps with all sort of information, from vacation photos to public transport pickup points. Now, overlays work with Google Maps too. You can type in a URL of a KML/KMZ file into Google Maps and it will show you the overlaid map — here’s an example showing Metrolink stations in Manchester. This just made Google Maps much more useful.

Don't Use Registry Cleaners

Using Registry Cleaners are a Bad Idea (via S Anand). I agree — if your registry has enough flotsam in it to impair your system’s performance and you don’t know enough to hand-edit the registry, you’re probably better off restoring from backups (you do have backups, right?) than trusting random registry cleaners that promise a sparkly-fresh computer for $29.

If you’re concerned about easily restoring your system, you’d be better off with Windows System Restore or spending money buying Norton Ghost and backing up images of your system.